Petleeuw Model 1940

Cap Lion Model 1940

By Ministerial Order No. 17 of the 19th of June 1940 the Dutch government-in-exile in London introduces the Petleeuw Model 1940 (Cap Lion Model 1940) to be used on by the Allies provided headgear.

The Cap Lion Model 1940 consists of a to the right climbing lion (although examples with a left climbing lion are known) derived from the Dutch National Coat of Arms standing on a scroll with the text “NEDERLAND” (Netherlands) or “NED. INDIE” (Dutch East-Indies). The lion in the National Coat of Arms bears a crown of three blades and two pearl dots, British made examples of the Cap Lion Model 1940 have however a royal crown.
In the right front claw it holds, in a raised position, a sword and in the left claw a bundle of seven arrows tied together with a ribbon. The Cap Lion Model 1940 has a height of ca. 4 cm. and a width of ca. 3 cm..
At the rear the Cap Lion Model 1940 as, produced in Great Britain or Australia, has originally a fastening construction consisting of a single bent lip or a safety pin. Also a construction with two eyelets is known.
Examples produced at a later date in The Netherlands are thinner and have also a fastening construction consisting of a two thin lips which have to bent after positioning on a piece of headgear.

The material used for the construction of the Cap Lion Model 1940 indicates the rank of the owner.
Till June 1944:
Beneden de rang van Adjudant-Onderofficier (Below the rank of Warrant Officer): brass
Officieren, Adjudant-Onderofficieren & Vaandrigs (Officers, Warrant Officers & Officer Cadets): bronze
Opperofficieren (General Officers): gilt brass / gold

From June 1944:
Beneden de rang van Adjudant-Onderofficier (Below the rank of Warrant Officer): brass
Subalterne Officieren, Adjudant-Onderofficieren, Vaandrigs & Kornetten (Junior Officers, Warrant Officers, Officer Cadets): bronze
Luitenant-Kolonels & Majoors (Lieutenant-Colonels & Majors): gilt brass / gold
Opperofficieren & Kolonels (General Officers & Colonels): gold thread on a black backing

Different maker marks on the Cap Lion Model 1940 are known, but also examples without a maker mark exist:
“CORZO” (Cordesius & Zonen at Batavia)
“J.R.GAUNT LONDON” / “J.R.GAUNT.LONDON”
“LUKE MELBOURNE”
“PARREE HORST”
“STOKES” (at Melbourne)
"WELDONA"

The design of the Cap Lion Model 1940 is revised in 1954 and finally repealed by Ministerial Order No. 253.259 of the 27th of February 1960.

A smaller golden variant of the Cap Lion Model 1940 is sold during World War Two in Great Britain as a war effort donation pin and is also un-officially worn on the uniform.
A silver version of the Cap Lion Model 1940 exist as well. This version is used as a tie-pin and comes in different sizes. One of the known makers of this tie-pin is Stokes in Melbourne.

Sources:
britishbadgeforum.com
maritiemdigitaal.nl
nederlandsemilitaria.com

Petleeuw Model 1940
This example Petleeuw Model 1940 (Cap Lion Model 1940) is made out of brass belonging to personnel below the rank of Warrant Officer. In fact it belonged to Korperaal-bottelier (Corporal-Bottler) R. J. van der Veen. The design of this example is British, but it is not marked.
Petleeuw Model 1940
This example Petleeuw Model 1940 (Cap Lion Model 1940) is made out of bronze belonging to a Junior Officer, Warrant Officer or Officer Cadet. It has the maker mark “STOKES” of Stokes located in Melbourne.